Anti-Inflammatory Diet

All health care starts with diet. My recommendations for a healthy diet are here:
Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Lifestyle.
There are over 190 articles on diet, inflammation and disease on this blog
(find topics using search [upper left] or index [lower right]), and
more articles by Prof. Ayers on Suite101 .

Sunday, September 28, 2008

Obscene Science

Typical science sometimes reveals the stupidity of some business practices. This is displayed in stark reality in the case of how animals are manipulated to mimic human diseases. Common human cosmetic procedures are applied to mice to cause arthritis and high fructose corn syrup is fed to mice to give them diabetes.

It is now possible to visualize the inflammation in mouse joints with special dyes that fluoresce in the infrared, outside of the absorbance wavelength of hemoglobin, but how do you give mice arthritis? The answer is obscenely easy -- inject them with collagen.  Then you can watch as their joints become inflamed.

I previously performed lots of Google searches on different aspects of collagen metabolism, so I know that the first ten thousand hits on any search with collagen as a search term result in the how-to’s of collagen injections for the high estrogen lip look.

Let’s go one step further. From my work on developing special methods for highly selective antibody production, I know that mice and other animals produce the most heightened, extreme reactions to the smallest amount of antigen when injected in critical areas such as toe pads or .....lips.

Putting this all together, shouldn’t injecting collagen into lips also be a great way for producing arthritis? At one point I put the pieces together for myself and did a search of collagen injection + side effect + arthritis, and guess what? As you might expect, if you inject your lips with collagen, you can produce arthritis. From my work on inflammation, I would suggest that you could use lip injection as a way of measuring the level of chronic inflammation. Inject collagens in the lips and measure the length of time until joint pain starts -- the shorter the time, the higher the level of chronic inflammation.

People ask why I am afraid of high fructose corn syrup. Let’s turn to animal models of disease once again for another example of obscene science. This time we are trying to study type II diabetes. How can I get mice to exhibit diabetes, so that I can study treatments that block the development or reverse diabetes? The answer is just feed them HFCS and they develop diabetes. That doesn’t happen with sucrose. Clearly HFCS is a dangerous sweetener, if you are concerned with diabetes. It is interesting that mice can be protected against HFCS by prior treatment with omega-3 fatty acids. This indicates that type II diabetes development is an inflammatory process.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Did you mean to say "doesn't happen with glocouse"? Or is there something less offensive about the fructose component of sucrose than the fructose in HFCS?

Dr. Art Ayers said...

Anon,
I meant that sucrose doesn't seem to be a problem. That is somewhat strange, because sucrose is converted into glucose and fructose in the intestines and I think in the liver. There may also be some conversion by gut flora, but that probably doesn't release much fructose. The conversion of sucrose to fructose is not simple.

I was recently looking for literature references on the chemical action of fructose chemically bonding to proteins. It used to be very easy to find and now it is much harder. Fructose is becoming safer in published studies.

Mrs. Ed said...

I enjoyed this post and I have wondered something very similar to this. Epilepsy is high among autistics. It is estimated that 30 percent have it. One day, while digging around in pub med, I noticed that one way to induce epilepsy in mice is to inject them with LPS. When testing an epilipsy drug they will do this. (A lightbulb went on for me cause at that point I had never realized how they found sick mice to do research on. I guess it's much easier to induce it than to call around looking for mice with epilepsy, ulcerative colitis, or whatever).
Anyways, they do this to test drugs for epilepsy. If they know LPS can cause this then why aren't all epileptics and those populations at high risk for it screened for LPS issues? They also do this to induce ulcerative colitis in mice.

This gave me more reason to believe that manipulating gut flora through diet may be a good thing. It also helped reinforce that wrong gut flora may be behind many health issues.

Dr. Art Ayers said...

Mrs. Ed,
I have seen numerous reports on the involvement of LPS in disease symptoms. I don't know if you have ever observed a case of scarlet fever, in which patches of inflamed skin dance across the body like fighting cephalopods. That is probably a response to LPS released from the primary infection into the blood stream and causing inflammation as it sweeps through various capillary beds.

Thanks for the posts.